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World's poorest people are the biggest losers from the Government's corporate tax policy

19 December 2016 - Today's Apple tax ruling reveals that the world’s poorest people are the biggest losers from the Government's corporate tax policy, says Christian Aid.


**Sorley McCaughey, Head of Policy and Advocacy with Christian Aid Ireland, is available for comment on 0870620062**

Today's Apple tax ruling has revealed that the poorest people are the biggest losers from the Irish Government's corporate tax policy, Christian Aid has said.

The ruling detailed the extent of Ireland’s selective treatment of Apple, which allowed the company to avoid paying billions in tax.

Sorley McCaughey, Head of Policy and Advocacy with Christian Aid Ireland, said:

'Today’s ruling confirms that some of Apple’s sales were made in Africa and the Middle East. It raises questions about the nature of Apple’s operations in African and Middle Eastern countries and whether it has paid the right amount of tax, in the right place, at the right time.

'While the majority of the sales will have been made in Europe, even a tiny fraction of the revenue being contested could generate important tax revenues in African and other developing countries.

'While the government’s focus is on defending accusations of having provided state aid, Christian Aid has long argued that their focus should equally be on the damage that Irish tax policy has done, and may well be still doing, to some of the poorest countries in the world.

'The IMF estimates that as much as $200 billion is lost to developing countries to multinational tax avoidance every year. Previous U.N. publications have referenced the "Double Irish" as being one of the ways in which developing countries are losing money.

'People on the margins, who rely on public services and the tax revenue that funds them, are the worst hit by tax avoidance and inequitable tax policies.

'International firms should no longer be allowed to outmanoeuvre the revenue authority and their public accountability to Ireland's citizens. It is time for the Irish government to be fully transparent in its arrangements with multinationals.'

-ENDS-

 

For media queries contact:

Meabh Smith
Head of Communications
Christian Aid Ireland
0872068483


Notes to editors: 

Sorley McCaughey, Head of Policy and Advocacy with Christian Aid Ireland, is available for comment on 0870620062

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