Daily reading: 2 August

One goes hungry and another becomes drunk.

Something to read

When you come together, it is not really to eat the Lord’s supper. 21 For when the time comes to eat, each of you goes ahead with your own supper, and one goes hungry and another becomes drunk.

1 Corinthians 11:20-21, from full reading 1 Corinthians 11: 17-22

Something to think about

Clearly, the celebrations of Holy Communion in the early days of the church in Corinth were very different to what we experience in church today, whatever our denomination.

What's all too familiar, though, is Paul’s perception that ‘there are divisions among you’. Differences of upbringing, church tradition, temperament and preferred style of worship can all tend to make us ’clannish’.

Unless we're on the alert, we can find ourselves only relating to those in our church who are like us and ignoring or even rejecting, everyone else.

The extreme caricature of this is described by Paul in today’s reading; a more likely expression of such self-absorption can be seen at the church door after the service, or at The Peace if we share only with our friends the gesture of mutual blessing designed to reconcile those who are estranged.

But to be effective Christians, we need to know ourselves as co-members of the Body of Christ, working together to bring His love and blessing to one another and to the world.

Something to do

Is there someone in your church, or on your road, whom you tend to avoid?

Make a point of making contact with them – at The Peace, in the street, in the supermarket.

Exchange a greeting; ask how they're doing; offer help if it's needed.

Something to pray

Holy God,

in your Son Jesus Christ you have drawn us together to further your reign of justice, mercy and peace;

pour your love into our hearts that we may honour one another as ourselves,

being servants of those in need and co-workers in your vineyard.

Amen.

Today’s contributor is Canon Ginnie Kennerley, editor of SEARCH – A Church of Ireland Journal, and former rector of Narraghmore and Castledermot in Glendalough diocese.